icon caret-left icon caret-right instagram pinterest linkedin facebook twitter goodreads question-circle facebook circle twitter circle linkedin circle instagram circle goodreads circle pinterest circle

WORDS FROM FRIENDS

TO DRINK FROM THE SILVER CUP

A PART OF THE BODY





I was born and raised in the Christian Reformed Church. My parents were missionaries in the Navajo Nation. As a passionate believer, I witnessed to my playmates and started begging to take communion when I was seven because I had asked Jesus into my heart. I expected that God would one day call me to serve. When I was sixteen, two women at Rehoboth Mission were discovered to be lovers and were expelled. A year earlier, I’d had a romantic relationship with my best friend, which confirmed something I’d sensed for a long time about who I was. I was terrified, thinking that I, too, might be expelled from the church that had cradled me and nurtured my spiritual growth, the church I loved.

Within two months of what happened to those two women, I became what would today be a statistic. I tried for the first time to kill myself. Studies Read More 
Be the first to comment

TO DRINK FROM THE SILVER CUP

SPIRITUALITY AND CREATIVITY
Part IV



My interview with Tina appears in four parts, to be followed by a piece on a painting of hers that hangs in my living room. In Part IV she talks about a transformative past life regression, about her training as an art therapist, and her current spiritual practices.

“You’ve said that you still believe in God. How do you perceive God now?” I asked.

“I want to tell you about this because I was really confused about this priest, and about when people say something that I think is BS. Usually I don’t speak a lot about my faith. But a long time ago a woman offered me a regression. My question was, ‘Why do I feel I belong in the Church, but in my own way?’

“So I came to this past life. I don’t know if it’s true, but Read More 
Be the first to comment

TO DRINK FROM THE SILVER CUP

SPIRITUALITY AND CREATIVITY
Part III



My interview with Tina appears in four parts, to be followed by a piece on a painting of hers that hangs in my living room. In Part III she talks about how marriage and mothering have impacted her spirituality and about how yoga and meditation helped her deal with two devastating fires in her business.

We sat for a moment and thought quietly about this. Then I asked, “How has marriage affected your spirituality?”

“Being with Rudi gives me a lot of stability. I know who to love. A lot of the confusion from my younger days is gone. And I know where we live. Because I’m very bevægelig (easily shifting). He’s not. That’s helpful. Secure. It’s a big part of sharing or being in a community. Centering my life in family is strong; it makes me take part in being here. I believe we are here; we belong here. It’s good for my core task. I need to be in balance. It’s very helpful.

“Of course it can be disturbing too because Read More 
Be the first to comment

TO DRINK FROM THE SILVER CUP

SPIRITUALITY AND CREATIVITY
Part II



In September, 2015, I interviewed my friend Tina Kragh Rusfort in the village of Vester Skerninge, Denmark. I posted the interview in four parts in May, 2016, followed by a piece on a painting of hers that hangs in my living room. I'm reposting my interview with her because it will be followed by a new interview that represents a companion piece to this one. And because what Tina has to say about spirituality and creativity is of value.

“How did you experience your spirituality as a young adult?” I asked.

“I experienced it as connected to creating. I had my special, sacred place with my paintings. To paint I needed to be alone, so I set up a nice area with a high quality of aloneness. I loved my colors. I fell in love with them when I was making them wet. So they would be ready for the alchemy. I would surrender to them, making a draft with pen. Then I would let the color talk because it would translate my feelings, so when I concentrated on one area of the motif—it might be a young couple or a woman in the garden—I wouldn’t control it. The motif would tell me its story. I had a lot of those pictures. Wet and wet.”

I was fascinated, though not at all surprised, since I’ve known Tina for a long time, by the interplay of imagery and spirituality in her life. I asked if there was more.

“Privateness,” she said. I wouldn’t know how  Read More 
Be the first to comment